What House Plants Are Poisonous to Animals?

What House Plants Are Poisonous to Animals? thumbnail
Identify aloe plant by the serated looking edges.

Houseplant enthusiasts who own pets must take care not to bring poisonous plants in the home. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals posts an extensive list of plants, toxic to cats, dogs and also horses. Puppies like to chew on everything and so do kittens and cats. Poisonous plants may not pose as much danger to an older dog that long ago gave up chewing and eating things, other than their own food. If you suspect your pet ate a poisonous houseplant, call your veterinarian immediately. If your vet isn't available call the ASPCA 24-hour emergency poison hotline directly at 1-888-426-4435. Does this Spark an idea?

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  1. Aloe Vera

    • Remove Aloe vera from the house. Known for its healing properties on burns, many people keep this plant in the kitchen for emergencies. Saponins in the plant can cause vomiting, depression, diarrhea, anorexia, tremors, and change in urine color in your pets. If you own a dog, but not a cat. Put this plant up high where the dog can't reach it. Remember, cats can climb so it's best to avoid placing this plant in the house.

    Caladium Hortulanum

    • Caladiums are known by many different common names such as elephant ears, mother-in-law plant, and pink cloud to name a few. The plant, commonly kept in homes, has large heart-shaped leaves which are dark-green on the edges and red on the centers. Common symptoms of ingestion of the poisonous property, insoluble calcium oxalates, are oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.

    Dieffenbachia Amoena

    • Dieffenbachia is a common houseplant with light and dark green leaves can cause oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing in your pets.

    Clivia Lily

    • Clivia lily are recognizable by their long, glossy green leaves and bright flowers. The most poisonous part of this plant contains the properties of lycorine and other alkaloids which can cause vomiting, salvation, diarrhea, convulsions, low blood pressure, tremors and cardiac arrhythmias. All lilies are poisonous to pets. Avoid giving Easter lily, a common gift plant, to those who own pets.

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